spencer's boy

master composter, worm translator, urban advocate, organic pioneer ...

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2 years ago with 222 notes

Via plantedcity

Tagged: chart climate change

plantedcity:

Infographic | Climate Change and Fossil Fuels: What Do You Think is More Likely? 
(Source: I Heart Climate Scientists)
* I’ve got one quibble with the infographic. It’s actually 97% of climate scientists, not 90%, that agree that human activity (i.e. burning fossil fuels, deforestation) is driving global climate change. 

plantedcity:

Infographic | Climate Change and Fossil Fuels: What Do You Think is More Likely? 

(Source: I Heart Climate Scientists)

* I’ve got one quibble with the infographic. It’s actually 97% of climate scientists, not 90%, that agree that human activity (i.e. burning fossil fuels, deforestation) is driving global climate change. 

(via turnoneatindialout)

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2 years ago with 20 notes

Via colewardell

Tagged: ag chart

colewardell:

Spectrum of agriculture from rural to urban

colewardell:

Spectrum of agriculture from rural to urban

(via iggymogo-deactivated20120925)

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2 years ago with 3 notes

Tagged: detroit poverty healthy food chart

Poor face obstacles in finding safe, healthy food in Detroit

 

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2 years ago with 321 notes

Via theatlantic

Tagged: graph chart jobs now and then

theatlantic:

Where Did All the Workers Go? 60 Years of Economic Change in 1 Graph

President Obama’s State of the Union speech was surprisingly bullish on reviving manufacturing, prompting one very clever person on Twitter to say something along the lines of: “Democrats want the economy of the 1950s, while Republicans just want to live there.”
It got me thinking: What did the economy look like in the 1950s? If you could organize all the jobs into buckets and compare the paper-shuffling professional services bucket to the manufacturing bucket, what would they look like around 1950, and how has the picture changed in the last 60 years? Read more.
[Image: Brian McGill and Peter Bell/National Journal]

theatlantic:

Where Did All the Workers Go? 60 Years of Economic Change in 1 Graph

President Obama’s State of the Union speech was surprisingly bullish on reviving manufacturing, prompting one very clever person on Twitter to say something along the lines of: “Democrats want the economy of the 1950s, while Republicans just want to live there.”

It got me thinking: What did the economy look like in the 1950s? If you could organize all the jobs into buckets and compare the paper-shuffling professional services bucket to the manufacturing bucket, what would they look like around 1950, and how has the picture changed in the last 60 years? Read more.

[Image: Brian McGill and Peter Bell/National Journal]

(via iggymogo-deactivated20120925)

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3 years ago with 17 notes

Via plantedcity

Tagged: chart oil use

plantedcity:

2010 was a milestone year: For the first time ever global oil demand exceeded supply  
From The Economist:

… As figures released in BP’s “Statistical Review of World Energy” show, global oil production has struggled to keep up with increased demand recently, particularly from Asia. In China alone consumption has risen by over 4m barrels per day in the past decade, accounting for two-fifths of the global rise. In 2010 consumption exceeded production by over 5m barrels per day for the first year ever, as world oil stocks were run down.

This development follows a recent admission from the International Energy Agency that global conventional oil production peaked in 2006. In other words, we have entered a volatile and expensive era of ‘extreme energy’. This means that people, businesses, communities and nations will need to adapt to this ‘new normal’. If you want to get a sense of some of the changes coming down the pipe check out global sustainability consultant Warren Karlenzig’s excellent posts on the topic. 

plantedcity:

2010 was a milestone year: For the first time ever global oil demand exceeded supply  

From The Economist:

… As figures released in BP’s “Statistical Review of World Energy” show, global oil production has struggled to keep up with increased demand recently, particularly from Asia. In China alone consumption has risen by over 4m barrels per day in the past decade, accounting for two-fifths of the global rise. In 2010 consumption exceeded production by over 5m barrels per day for the first year ever, as world oil stocks were run down.

This development follows a recent admission from the International Energy Agency that global conventional oil production peaked in 2006. In other words, we have entered a volatile and expensive era of ‘extreme energy’. This means that people, businesses, communities and nations will need to adapt to this ‘new normal’. If you want to get a sense of some of the changes coming down the pipe check out global sustainability consultant Warren Karlenzig’s excellent posts on the topic. 

(via thegreenurbanist)

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3 years ago with 102 notes

Via gjmueller

Tagged: youth education chart time TV


Minority children spend an average of 13 hours a day using mobile devices, computers, TVs and other media — about 4½ hours more than white kids, says a report out today. The findings, from Northwestern University, are being presented to childhood and telecommunications experts in Washington, D.C.
The results are from an analysis of two Kaiser Family Foundation surveys that tracked media use by kids 6 to 18. Researchers analyzed that data to find out how black, Hispanic, Asian American and white youth use media for homework and for fun, and how long they’re plugged in on any given day.

Minority children spend an average of 13 hours a day using mobile devices, computers, TVs and other media — about 4½ hours more than white kids, says a report out today. The findings, from Northwestern University, are being presented to childhood and telecommunications experts in Washington, D.C.

The results are from an analysis of two Kaiser Family Foundation surveys that tracked media use by kids 6 to 18. Researchers analyzed that data to find out how black, Hispanic, Asian American and white youth use media for homework and for fun, and how long they’re plugged in on any given day.

(via blackgirlphresh)

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3 years ago with 10 notes

Via gjmueller

Tagged: education them and us time poverty chart


The brief, Portraits: Initial College Attendance of Low-Income Young Adults,  experts at the Institute for Higher Education Policy (IHEP) suggest  that poverty still matters a great deal in terms of the types of  institutions at which young adults are initially enrolling.  In  particular, they find that low-income students—between ages 18 and 26  and whose total household income is near or below the federal poverty  level—are likely to be overrepresented at for-profit institutions and are likely to be underrepresented at public and private nonprofit four-year institutions.

The brief, Portraits: Initial College Attendance of Low-Income Young Adults, experts at the Institute for Higher Education Policy (IHEP) suggest that poverty still matters a great deal in terms of the types of institutions at which young adults are initially enrolling. In particular, they find that low-income students—between ages 18 and 26 and whose total household income is near or below the federal poverty level—are likely to be overrepresented at for-profit institutions and are likely to be underrepresented at public and private nonprofit four-year institutions.

(via ditigalcity)

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3 years ago with 1 note

Via stopkillingourworld-deactivated

Tagged: chart brazil land

stopkillingourworld:

Adelino “Dinho” Ramos, the president of the Movimento Camponeses Corumbiara e da Associação dos Camponeses do Amazonas, a small farmers association, was gunned down front of his family Friday morning in Rondônia. Brazil’s Special Secretariat for Human Rights, an office of the president, said it was unclear who killed Ramos, who had received death threats from loggers. Ramos survived a 1995 massacre in which 13 people were killed. His killing came just three days after Joao Claudio Ribeiro da Silva and his wife, Maria do Espirito Santo, were killed in an ambush near their home in the state of Pará. Suspicion immediately fell on illegal loggers linked to the charcoal trade that supplies pig iron smelters in the region. Da Silva had been a prominent environmentalist and the recipient of international recognition as well as numbers death threats. 
I did not realize that Maria do Espirito Santo was also killed… the articles I read said her husband was killed in front of her.  The horror. To die for something so sacred, so important and for it to go unpunished…  

stopkillingourworld:

Adelino “Dinho” Ramos, the president of the Movimento Camponeses Corumbiara e da Associação dos Camponeses do Amazonas, a small farmers association, was gunned down front of his family Friday morning in Rondônia. Brazil’s Special Secretariat for Human Rights, an office of the president, said it was unclear who killed Ramos, who had received death threats from loggers. Ramos survived a 1995 massacre in which 13 people were killed. 

His killing came just three days after Joao Claudio Ribeiro da Silva and his wife, Maria do Espirito Santo, were killed in an ambush near their home in the state of Pará. Suspicion immediately fell on illegal loggers linked to the charcoal trade that supplies pig iron smelters in the region. Da Silva had been a prominent environmentalist and the recipient of international recognition as well as numbers death threats. 

I did not realize that Maria do Espirito Santo was also killed… the articles I read said her husband was killed in front of her.  The horror. To die for something so sacred, so important and for it to go unpunished…  


(via stopkillingourworld-deactivated)

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3 years ago with 19 notes

Via candyclawsfuture

Tagged: evolution tree of life time chart

candyclawsfuture:

Eisenberg’s simple, beautiful Tree of Life.

candyclawsfuture:

Eisenberg’s simple, beautiful Tree of Life.

(Source: candyclawsfuture, via waskiri)