spencer's boy

master composter, worm translator, urban advocate, organic pioneer ...

apartmentgardeningproject:

I would not have believed it if I hadn’t witnessed it myself.  

Hail storm in June.  

Winnipeg…this Dennis the Menace routine is getting old.

(via foodshuttleurbanag)

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2 years ago with 4 notes

Via gardenup

Tagged: local food bj's

gardenup:

US: BJ’s Wholsale Club goes local BJ’s Wholesale Club announced that its locally grown produce program, “Farm to Club,” will be available in each of its 195 clubs in all 15 states where its clubs are located. The program, which provides BJ’s Members with quality, fresh produce from their state’s local farms, is rolling out this spring and summer. Farm to Club produce includes a variety of fresh fruits and vegetables including zucchini, tomatoes, corn, green peppers, yellow squash and cucumbers and will be clearly marked with a special “Farm to Club, Locally Grown” seal.While there is no official standard to define “local,” BJ’s defines “local” as grown within the state. Buying local produce benefits BJ’s members, their communities, and helps to preserve local farms. Locally grown produce is picked at the peak of its flavor, and since the produce doesn’t have far to travel, its nutritional value and freshness are preserved. Buying local also helps the area’s economy by building up the local agricultural industry and by helping keep money within the community.“As a buyer at BJ’s, I strive to provide the very best produce for members,” said Rob Johnson, Produce Buyer for BJ’s Wholesale Club. “The Farm to Club program is very good for both the members who buy the local fruits and veggies and the farmers who are growing our food.”The Farm to Club program is rolling out now through summer 2012, and as the weather and growing season for each vegetable and fruit varies from state to state, so do the dates Farm to Club produce becomes available. Currently, Farm to Club produce is available in all Florida Clubs. Source: www.perishablenews.com

gardenup:

US: BJ’s Wholsale Club goes local 

BJ’s Wholesale Club announced that its locally grown produce program, “Farm to Club,” will be available in each of its 195 clubs in all 15 states where its clubs are located. The program, which provides BJ’s Members with quality, fresh produce from their state’s local farms, is rolling out this spring and summer. Farm to Club produce includes a variety of fresh fruits and vegetables including zucchini, tomatoes, corn, green peppers, yellow squash and cucumbers and will be clearly marked with a special “Farm to Club, Locally Grown” seal.

While there is no official standard to define “local,” BJ’s defines “local” as grown within the state. Buying local produce benefits BJ’s members, their communities, and helps to preserve local farms. Locally grown produce is picked at the peak of its flavor, and since the produce doesn’t have far to travel, its nutritional value and freshness are preserved. Buying local also helps the area’s economy by building up the local agricultural industry and by helping keep money within the community.

“As a buyer at BJ’s, I strive to provide the very best produce for members,” said Rob Johnson, Produce Buyer for BJ’s Wholesale Club. “The Farm to Club program is very good for both the members who buy the local fruits and veggies and the farmers who are growing our food.”

The Farm to Club program is rolling out now through summer 2012, and as the weather and growing season for each vegetable and fruit varies from state to state, so do the dates Farm to Club produce becomes available. Currently, Farm to Club produce is available in all Florida Clubs. 

Source: www.perishablenews.com

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2 years ago with 59 notes

Via fuckyeahenvironmentalism

Tagged: local food

fireonthemountain:

fuckyeahenvironmentalism:

A good new years resolution.
The Low Carbon Diet:
Buy fruit, vegetables, eggs, meat and milk from local farmers, participate in a Produce Share or CSA
Choose cakes and bread from local bakeries or make your own from scratch
Resist international supermarkets for food that you can buy from your own community =[ sad but true
Pick nationally produced foods over exotic ingredients (unless it’s a special meal or unless its mass produced by shitty agribusiness i.e. soy, corn, wheat in many cases…eat local and eat organic)
Eat less meat. Either smaller portions or fewer times a week (not true for all, some people eat correct size or smaller portions, obesity is not the only dietary issue in America and we must be sensitive of it, regardless though Americans eat supersized portions that are skewed in the direction of meats, dairy, and carbs). 
Consider trying soya milk and yogurts over dairy and make your own fermented foods (ie almond milk yogurt, kefir, or kombucha) ORR raise a dairy goat!
Grow your own! this is one of the most important things you can do.
Pick organic whenever you can afford to re-arrage your spending so that your money goes to things that your body depends on  (NEEDS) (nutritious & organic food) instead of things that you simply want
Go outside, exercise, meditate and be mindful

emphasis done in bold by moi

fireonthemountain:

fuckyeahenvironmentalism:

A good new years resolution.

The Low Carbon Diet:

  • Buy fruit, vegetables, eggs, meat and milk from local farmers, participate in a Produce Share or CSA
  • Choose cakes and bread from local bakeries or make your own from scratch
  • Resist international supermarkets for food that you can buy from your own community =[ sad but true
  • Pick nationally produced foods over exotic ingredients (unless it’s a special meal or unless its mass produced by shitty agribusiness i.e. soy, corn, wheat in many cases…eat local and eat organic)
  • Eat less meat. Either smaller portions or fewer times a week (not true for all, some people eat correct size or smaller portions, obesity is not the only dietary issue in America and we must be sensitive of it, regardless though Americans eat supersized portions that are skewed in the direction of meats, dairy, and carbs)
  • Consider trying soya milk and yogurts over dairy and make your own fermented foods (ie almond milk yogurt, kefir, or kombucha) ORR raise a dairy goat!
  • Grow your own! this is one of the most important things you can do.
  • Pick organic whenever you can afford to re-arrage your spending so that your money goes to things that your body depends on  (NEEDS) (nutritious & organic food) instead of things that you simply want
  • Go outside, exercise, meditate and be mindful

emphasis done in bold by moi

next thursday in the yo!

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2 years ago with 171 notes

Via mothernaturenetwork

Tagged: local food farmers farmers markets produce jobs

mothernaturenetwork:

Need a job? Become a farmer.The growing demand for new markets highlights the lack of new farmers entering the agricultural business.

mothernaturenetwork:

Need a job? Become a farmer.
The growing demand for new markets highlights the lack of new farmers entering the agricultural business.

(via ediblestreets)

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2 years ago with 5 notes

Via umdwatershed

Tagged: local local food how to why time

umdwatershed:

10 Reasons to Eat Local Food by Jennifer Maiser
Eating local means more for the local economy. 
Locally grown produce is fresher. 
Local food just plain tastes better. 
Locally grown fruits and vegetables have longer to ripen.
Eating local is better for air quality and pollution than eating organic. 
Buying local food keeps us in touch with the seasons. 
Buying locally grown food is fodder for a wonderful story.
Eating local protects us from bio-terrorism.  
Local food translates to more variety. 
Supporting local providers supports responsible land development.

umdwatershed:

10 Reasons to Eat Local Food by Jennifer Maiser

Eating local means more for the local economy. 

Locally grown produce is fresher. 

Local food just plain tastes better. 

Locally grown fruits and vegetables have longer to ripen.

Eating local is better for air quality and pollution than eating organic. 

Buying local food keeps us in touch with the seasons. 

Buying locally grown food is fodder for a wonderful story.

Eating local protects us from bio-terrorism.  

Local food translates to more variety. 

Supporting local providers supports responsible land development.

mauricesmall:

The future of urban agriculture is not about the 10-mile diet

The ’garden block’ concept embeds pockets of food growing within the urban fabric.Rendering: Daniel NairnRendering of garden block

reminds me of new jack city.  sb

(via urbanfarmingphotos)

When “Eating Local” is the only option

nakshatra:

This past weekend was truly no less than magical.  For the first time in my life, I got to experience the holiday of Holi in India.  I have been wanting to do this for as long as I can remember, and believe me, it did not disappoint.  But during the weekend I also had the time to reflect and contemplate on a lot of different but intersecting topics.  I originally planned to write an overview of the whole weekend, but I realized that one topic in particular deserved a more thorough fleshing out.  Where I am right now, almost everyone is a farmer, and growing food is the main way in which people both feed themselves and make money.  I began to think about how traditional farming—where one family grows a number of different types of crops to feed themselves and to sell, and which has become all but obsolete in the United States—is so central and vital to life here.

The day before Holi, several of us went to a village that one of the staff here at SEARCH is from, called Churchurra.  Our friend grew up on a farm in that village, and she took us through the fields to see the onions, garlic, tomatoes, chickpeas, rice, and all the other delicious things growing on their plot.  In addition to just walking around the village, swinging from banyan trees and other chicanery, the highlight of the trip was our amazing lunch we made together, with almost all ingredients retrieved directly from her backyard—I mean, we’re talking going out to pick green chickpeas and 20 minutes later turning them into a tasty spicy dish.  I hate to romanticize it, but I felt like I finally was eating the way so many in the U.S. strive to eat—direct from field to home, knowing exactly where your food comes from.  I recently said to some friends in NYC who were talking about yuppies in Brooklyn making their own flour that some rich people do for novelty what most poor people do out of necessity.  Of course, in India in general, even in the cities, the way people eat is very different from the way people eat in the States.  Processed food and eating out still has not caught on to the masses, and even middle-class families eat almost every meal at home or pack food from home.  In contrast, by the latest measures, Americans buy a majority of their meals readily made—and poor families are among the worst hit by this strange paradox, that it is often cheaper to buy your meals than to prepare them yourself.

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