spencer's boy

master composter, worm translator, urban advocate, organic pioneer ...

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4 months ago with 861 notes

Via theatlantic

Tagged: education school them and us

theatlantic:

Finnish Education Chief: ‘We Created a School System Based on Equality’

Finnish education often seems paradoxical to outside observers because it appears to break a lot of the rules we take for granted. Finnish children don’t begin school until age 7. They have more recess, shorter school hours than many U.S. children do (nearly 300 fewer hours per year in elementary school), and the lightest homework load of any industrialized nation. There are no gifted programs, almost no private schools, and no high-stakes national standardized tests.
Yet over the past decade Finland has consistently performed among the top nations on the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), a standardized test given to 15-year olds in 65 nations and territories around the world. Finland’s school children didn’t always excel. Finland built its excellent, efficient, and equitable educational system in a few decades from scratch, and the concept guiding almost every educational reform has been equity.  The Finnish paradox is that by focusing on the bigger picture for all, Finland has succeeded at fostering the individual potential of most every child.
I recently accompanied Krista Kiuru, Finland’s minister of education and science, when she visited the Eliot K-8 Innovation School in Boston, and asked her what Finland is doing that we could learn from.
Read more.[Image: hydropeek/flickr]

theatlantic:

Finnish Education Chief: ‘We Created a School System Based on Equality’

Finnish education often seems paradoxical to outside observers because it appears to break a lot of the rules we take for granted. Finnish children don’t begin school until age 7. They have more recess, shorter school hours than many U.S. children do (nearly 300 fewer hours per year in elementary school), and the lightest homework load of any industrialized nation. There are no gifted programs, almost no private schools, and no high-stakes national standardized tests.

Yet over the past decade Finland has consistently performed among the top nations on the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), a standardized test given to 15-year olds in 65 nations and territories around the world. Finland’s school children didn’t always excel. Finland built its excellent, efficient, and equitable educational system in a few decades from scratch, and the concept guiding almost every educational reform has been equity.  The Finnish paradox is that by focusing on the bigger picture for all, Finland has succeeded at fostering the individual potential of most every child.

I recently accompanied Krista Kiuru, Finland’s minister of education and science, when she visited the Eliot K-8 Innovation School in Boston, and asked her what Finland is doing that we could learn from.

Read more.[Image: hydropeek/flickr]

(via plotscape)

mauricesmall:

urban youth (jane addams), a film crew (less productions) and maurice small discuss urban food.  food access in the hood is at its most critical. watch and imagine what you can do to help build a bridge.  sb

(via minnoxx-deactivated20130308)

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2 years ago with 94 notes

Via plantedcity

Tagged: bike art youth school wow

iggymogo:

plantedcity:

Getting Around: ‘Children Cycling to School’ (Infographic)
Related:
‘Charter of Vancouver – Children have the right to cycle’ (ECF)
(Source: ECF)

way to go america! america has way too many predators. and the world’s worst drivers… it’s just too dangerous for any one to be on the road with them.

iggymogo:

plantedcity:

Getting Around: ‘Children Cycling to School’ (Infographic)

Related:

(Source: ECF)

way to go america! america has way too many predators. and the world’s worst drivers… it’s just too dangerous for any one to be on the road with them.

(via iggymogo-deactivated20120925)

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2 years ago with 3 notes

Via erinoliver

Tagged: school Composting compost

13. Initiate Composting In My Dorm

erinoliver:


Going back to my 20/20 List,I said that I wanted to start composting in my dorm, so when I was in need of a research idea for one of my classes (DEA1500), I knew I’d have to start composting in my dorm. And I did! Now I present to you a draft of my research presentation! 

(Sorry for the lack of what would be a lovely narration by moi ;P ) 

Read More

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2 years ago with 4 notes

Via nyccase

Tagged: compost Composting school

Composting in Public Schools

nyccase:

Did you know that, every day, New York City produces enough garbage to fill Yankee Stadium? Over 30% of that garbage is food waste; and when it rots in landfills, it produces methane – a potent greenhouse gas. NYC spends $4 billion a year trucking its garbage to other states because we don’t have anywhere to put it.
Now, an Upper West Side school - PS 166 - wants to do its share to help solve the garbage crisis.

Video

2 years ago with 1 note

Via ditigalcity

Tagged: school prison

ditigalcity:

school to prison

Text

2 years ago with 1 note

Tagged: school school lunch school food jamie oliver LA

jamie oliver

Jamie Oliver in Los Angeles

School Garden Farmscape school garden installation in Long Beach, CA

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3 years ago with 2,186 notes

Via futurejournalismproject

Tagged: teachers education school

futurejournalismproject:

Who Pays Teachers Best for their Time?
Hours primary school teachers spend working on the left.
Teachers salary after 15 years of experience / GDP per capita on the right
The biggie version of this infographic also includes: how much teachers around the world make (Luxembourgh tops), average class size (Mexico tops… or bottoms if you will) and salary levels vs student achievement (Finland tops). 

futurejournalismproject:

Who Pays Teachers Best for their Time?

Hours primary school teachers spend working on the left.

Teachers salary after 15 years of experience / GDP per capita on the right

The biggie version of this infographic also includes: how much teachers around the world make (Luxembourgh tops), average class size (Mexico tops… or bottoms if you will) and salary levels vs student achievement (Finland tops). 

(Source: futurejournalismproject, via joinakibbutz)